HOW DO I LOOK?

You’ve booked the date with your photographer and have spent hours in front of the mirror, trying on different things to perfect your pose – or maybe you’ve just decided to take the bull by the horns and “wing it”, saying you’ll just do whatever feels natural on the day.

“The Day” is almost here and you’re bursting with anticipation (or fear, because it’s a daunting thing if you’re not a seasoned movie star or runway model), and you think you’re just about as ready as you can be when – oh, wait. What on earth are you going to wear? *cue panic*

Being prepared for your photoshoot is one of the best things you can do – at least in the wardrobe department – as it’s not something you can just decide on last-minute. It’s easy to just throw something together but unfortunately, choosing whatever might be lying around out of convenience may reflect in the end result.

COLOUR MATTERS:

You know how an artist will sometimes sit and ramble about different pantones and shades of, say, orange? It’s not because they’re fussy (though, most of the time, we are), but it’s because they know that the correct shade of orange will bring out the best in their work, and bring out the best in surrounding colours as well – because they’re supposed to compliment each other.

The same goes for photography. Certain colours (or shades of said colour) reflect differently and bounce off one another.

You’ll want to make sure you decide on warm, earthy tones that compliment your complexion, or subtle hues that welcome the camera rather than blind it with neon. Pastels, neutral colours and cooler colours work well – feel free to add accent colours (blues, yellows, pinks) to your base colours (browns, tans, greys) to make them stand out, as long as they compliment each other.

WHAT NOT TO WEAR:

The camera never lies (unless you want it to), and can easily pick up contrasting colours or patterns, which will make for an unfortunate end result.

Be sure to avoid strong, abstract patterns, print or bold lettering, polka-dots, stripes, checkered shirts – anything that might distract from you (you are, after all, the star of the shoot, not your clothes – don’t let them steal your spotlight.) Avoid attention-grabbing accessories and colours that make you look washed out and faded.

You want to be comfortable but stylish – just not screaming it from the rooftops 🙂

POST-PRODUCTION:

Editing is a big part of any shoot and by choosing to wear something that should be avoided to a shoot, means that the post-shoot process is going to take a lot longer and you might not get the result you expected when you get your photos back – contrary to popular belief, editing can’t fix everything.

I hope this post has helped you to decide what (and what not) to wear when choosing your outfit for your shoot. 🙂

Less is more!

COLOUR MATTERS:

You know how an artist will sometimes sit and ramble about different pantones and shades of, say, orange? It’s not because they’re fussy (though, most of the time, we are), but it’s because they know that the correct shade of orange will bring out the best in their work, and bring out the best in surrounding colours as well – because they’re supposed to compliment each other.

The same goes for photography. Certain colours (or shades of said colour) reflect differently and bounce off one another.

You’ll want to make sure you decide on warm, earthy tones that compliment your complexion, or subtle hues that welcome the camera rather than blind it with neon. Pastels, neutral colours and cooler colours work well – feel free to add accent colours (blues, yellows, pinks) to your base colours (browns, tans, greys) to make them stand out, as long as they compliment each other.

WHAT NOT TO WEAR:

The camera never lies (unless you want it to), and can easily pick up contrasting colours or patterns, which will make for an unfortunate end result.

Be sure to avoid strong, abstract patterns, print or bold lettering, polka-dots, stripes, checkered shirts – anything that might distract from you (you are, after all, the star of the shoot, not your clothes – don’t let them steal your spotlight.) Avoid attention-grabbing accessories and colours that make you look washed out and faded.

You want to be comfortable but stylish – just not screaming it from the rooftops 🙂

POST-PRODUCTION:

Editing is a big part of any shoot and by choosing to wear something that should be avoided to a shoot, means that the post-shoot process is going to take a lot longer and you might not get the result you expected when you get your photos back – contrary to popular belief, editing can’t fix everything.

I hope this post has helped you to decide what (and what not) to wear when choosing your outfit for your shoot. 🙂

Less is more!